ELEMENTARY ARABIC I (AB1010)

Type: 

Regular

This course is designed to familiarize beginners with the Arabic alphabet system and Arabic writing as well as provide the basis for limited conversation.

ELEMENTARY ARABIC II (AB1020)

Type: 

Regular

AB 1020 seeks to give students grammar basics with which they can start to structure their knowledge and practice and make comparisons with other linguistic systems they know. The two conjugations, the two kind of sentences and other material allows the students to go further and to progress in organizing the new lexicon in order to produce sentences in Standard Arabic. The domain covered by the course starts from everyday life and aims to reach fundamental description vocabulary for all kind of documents : dialogs, texts, songs, maps, school documents, proverbs, etc.

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I (AB1030)

Type: 

Regular

After studying the principles of morphological derivation which makes the students able to structure their understanding of the vocabulary production system, the course focuses on producing small texts expressing the students’ opinion and description of the material seen during the sessions. AB 530 gives the opportunity to go beyond simple contact and to interact in Arabic within the fields covered by the different documents. The field covered by the didactic documents broadens out to short authentic texts, short articles and literary production, as well as authentic documents such as letters, cards, advertisings, announcements…

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II (AB1040)

Type: 

Regular

Starting from the acquired grammar knowledge (specially the morphological derivation), AB 1040 works on going into more specialized vocabulary in various fields such as intellectual conversation, objective description, expressing one’s opinion, etc. Besides, this course pursues production skills, so the students can grow linguistically in handling of Arabic and acquiring a more detailed lexical mass.

ARABIC LANGUAGE & LITERATURE II (AB1070)

Type: 

Regular

ELEMENTARY ARABIC I (AB5010)

Type: 

Regular

This course is designed to familiarize beginners with the Arabic alphabet system and Arabic writing as well as provide the basis for limited conversation.

ELEMENTARY ARABIC II (AB5020)

Type: 

Regular

AB5020 seeks to give students grammar basics with which they can start to structure their knowledge and practice and make comparisons with other linguistic systems they know. The two conjugations, the two kind of sentences and other material allows the students to go further and to progress in organizing the new lexicon in order to produce sentences in Standard Arabic. The domain covered by the course starts from everyday life and aims to reach fundamental description vocabulary for all kind of documents : dialogs, texts, songs, maps, school documents, proverbs, etc.

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I (AB5030)

Type: 

Regular

After studying the principles of morphological derivation which makes the students able to structure their understanding of the vocabulary production system, the course focuses on producing small texts expressing the students’ opinion and description of the material seen during the sessions. AB 530 gives the opportunity to go beyond simple contact and to interact in Arabic within the fields covered by the different documents. The field covered by the didactic documents broadens out to short authentic texts, short articles and literary production, as well as authentic documents such as letters, cards, advertisings, announcements…

INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II (AB5040)

Type: 

Regular

Starting from the acquired grammar knowledge (especially the morphological derivation), AB 5040 works on going into more specialized vocabulary in vaious fields such as intellectual conversation, objective description, expressing one’s opinion, etc. Besides, this course pursues production skills, so the students can grow linguistically in handling of Arabic and acquiring a more detailed lexical mass.

ARABIC LITERATURE II (AB5070)

Type: 

Regular

This course continues the exploration of Arabic literature, integrating increasingly more pieces from the classical period (the first Adab era, Adab taken here as humanities). Frequenting the classical Arabic adab allows the students to deepen their linguistic knowledge and to see more precisely how the lexicon evolved through the ages and, therefore, to better understand how terms and concepts moved from one field of application to nother (history, philosophy, poetry, religion, geography narrations, tales, akhbar, etc.). Linguistic knowledge is here deeply related to history of thought and representations through texts reveal a certain conception of the world and humanity.

INTRO TO WESTERN ART I (AH1000)

Type: 

GE100

Teaches the skills needed for an informed approach to art and architecture by introducing the salient concepts, techniques, and developments of Western Art. Studies works from ancient Greece, Rome, and the European Middle Ages in their K19 historical, social, and cultural contexts. Includes visits to museums and monuments in and around Paris.

INTRO TO ART THROUGH PARIS MUSEUMS (AH1003)

Type: 

GE100

Uses the unsurpassed richness of the art museums of Paris as the principal teaching resource. The history of Western Art is studied through the close examination of a limited selection of major works in a variety of media. The works chosen illuminate the political, social and religious contexts of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo periods, and the modern epoch. The course has an extra course fee of 35 euros.

PAGES

  • 1

 

INTRO TO WESTERN ART II (AH1020)

Type: 

GE100

Continues the study of the most significant monuments of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. Emphasizes historical context, continuity, and critical analysis. Includes direct contact with works of art in Parisian museums.

LES JEUNES ONT LA PAROLE (AH1030)

Type: 

Regular

Les Jeunes ont la parole is a program organized by the Louvre Museum, in cooperation with a dozen Parisian educational institutions including The American University of Paris, to attract the younger generation into its venerable walls. As part of the Louvre’s Les Nocturnes du vendredi, participating students dialogue with peers and other museum visitors around a work of art that he or she has studied in depth. A unique hands-on opportunity, the one-credit course involves preparatory meetings, preliminary research, Friday-evening presentations, and a final write-up.

PARIS THROUGH ITS ARCHITECTURE I (AH2000)

Type: 

GE100

Investigates the growth patterns of Paris from Roman times through the Second Empire. Studies major monuments, pivotal points of urban design, and vernacular architecture on site. Presents the general vocabulary of architecture, the history of French architecture and urban planning, as well as a basic knowledge of French history to provide a framework for understanding the development of Paris.

ANCIENT ART & ARCHITECTURE (AH2011)

Type: 

GE100

Introduces first the specific contributions of Greek art to the Western tradition. Then presents the diversification of these achievements in the Etruscan civilization and in the Hellenistic age. Examines how the Romans absorbed, continued, and creatively transformed Greek and Etruscan art and passed the ancient heritage on to medieval and early modern Europe. AH 1000 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

MEDIEVAL ART & ARCHITECTURE (AH2012)

Type: 

GE100

Explores the adaptation of ancient art by the Christian religious establishment and the interaction of early medieval artists with the Graeco-Roman tradition. Follows the development of medieval art in the West to the Gothic period by analyzing its spiritual dimensions and diversity as well as the impact on artistic creation of the changing centers of power and influences. AH 1000 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

RENAISSANCE ART & ARCHITECTURE (AH2013)

Type: 

GE100

Surveys notable developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy and in Northern Europe (late 13th-16th centuries). Emphasizes the origins of the Renaissance and the basic stylistic evolution from Early to High Renaissance and Mannerism. Explores the ramifications of the Italian Renaissance mode as it came into contact with other historical and cultural traditions in Northern Europe. AH 1000 and AH 1020 are strongly recommended as prerequisites.

BAROQUE & ROCOCO ART & ARCHITECTURE (AH2014)

Type: 

GE100

Examines the dynamic and often militant Baroque style in Counter-Reformation Italy and its national variants in France, Spain, and Flanders. Traces the development of new and different modes of expression in the emerging Protestant Netherlands. Explores the evolution from Baroque to Rococo as well as the arts of the 18th-Century in France and England. AH 1020 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

19TH & 20TH CENT. ART & ARCHITECTURE (AH2016)

Type: 

GE100

Introduces the principal arts and aesthetic issues of the 19th and 20th centuries from the French Revolution to World War II. Studies artists such as David, Turner, Monet, and Picasso, as well as movements such as Romanticism, Impressionism, and Surrealism, stressing continuities beneath apparent differences of approach. Regular museum sessions at the Louvre, the Musee d’Orsay, and the Centre Pompidou. AH 1020 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

ART AND THE MARKET (AH2018)

Type: 

Regular

Investigates economic and financial aspects of art over several historical periods. Examines painting, sculpture, drawing, and decorative arts as marketable products, analyzing them from the perspective of patrons, collectors, investors, and speculators. Studies artists as entrepreneurs. Assesses diverse functions and forms of influence exercised by art market specialists: critics, journalists, public officials, auctioneers, museum professionals, experts, and dealers.

INTRO TO ISLAMIC ART & ARCHITECTURE (AH2024)

Type: 

GE100

The aim of this course is to introduce students to the multifaceted and dynamic character of Islamic art by focusing on the highest achievements of the major dynasties. The time frame will span over one thousand years and, geographically, will cover lands from the western Mediterranean to the Indian subcontinent. Lectures will concentrate on the most representative monuments and works of art from each period. After examining the distinguishing features of the art and architecture of the principal dynasties, their salient characteristics and their greatest contributions to Islamic art as a whole, it should become evident that the field is both full of striking diversity and overall unity.

IMPRESSIONISM – POST-IMPRESSIONISM (AH3000)

Type: 

Regular

Discusses the stylistic and thematic concerns of Manet, Monet, Degas, Pissarro, and Renoir, in the context of artistic theory and practice in mid-19th-century France. Analyzes the art of Gauguin, Van Gogh, CÈzanne, and Seurat as responses to impressionism. Classes at the Musee d’Orsay are scheduled regularly. AH 1020 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY (AH3017)

Type: 

GE100

Introduces students to the evolution of photography, which is both closely related to modern painting and clearly distinct from it. Focuses on K60major figures such as Atget, Weston, Stieglitz, Steichen, Hine, Brassao, and Man Ray, in an effort to develop the visual skills necessary to understand photographs as specific forms of artistic vision and creation. AH 1020 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

UTILITY & SUBVERSION: THE OBJECT IN 20TH CENT. ART (AH3020)

Type: 

Regular

From cubist assemblage to multimedia contemporary art installations, from Duchamp’s ready-made to the design departments in prominent art museums, the presence of objects –in the sense of things, everyday utensils–is pervasive in 20th century Art History. Mixing up high and low culture, aestheticizing the common and desacralizing the unique, the object in art has cast into question the traditional definition of art in Western Culture. This course will highlight the different implications of the object as the subject of art, as the material for art, as design product, as a trigger of spatial experience. We will explore how, in the context of a fast developing consumerism, the art revolving around the object, whether conciliating or critical, expresses and clarifies our relation to a complex and sometimes contradictory modern world. Major examples in art and design history from the end of the 19th to end of the 20th century will be discussed in class or during museum/workshop visits, in order to reach an understanding of our object-invested cultural and material environment.

VERSAILLES: FROM ABSOLUTISM TO ENGLIGHTENMENT (AH3043)

Type: 

Regular

This course examines the cultural and artistic history of Versailles in the 17th and 18th centuries. It traces the development of the palace, garden and city as a total artwork and an expression of changing ideas around the court, the monarchy and the state. From its origins as a hunting retreat and setting for ephemeral courtly entertainments, through to its apogee as the seat of the absolutist state at the end of the 17th century, and then its decline and collapse less than a century later, we will see how architecture, painting and decorative arts articulated evolving ideas around the divinity of the monarch, and the opposition between the private, courtly and public spheres. We will see how artists and architects such as Mansart, LeBrun, Le Nôtre, Gabriel, Mique and Robert created artworks and settings for the amusement and glorification of the king. In addition to class lectures there will be visits to the Louvre, Versailles, and Vaux-le-Vicomte.

PRINCES & PATRONS 17TH C EUR (AH3053)

Type: 

Regular

Offers students more specialized knowledge of specific aspects of art produced during the Baroque, Rococo, and Neoclassical ages. Topics vary. Offerings include: Three Baroque Masters: Rubens, Rembrandt, and Velazquez; Caravaggio and the Caravaggisti; and Princes and Patrons: Art Collecting and Patronage in 17th Century Europe, Taste and Society; Eighteenth Century French and English Art and Art Collecting.

EARLY 20TH CENTURY ART (AH3061)

Type: 

Regular

“Every act of creation,” said Pablo Picasso, “is first of all an act of destruction.” In the field of art, the early 20th century is undoubtedly a time of accelerated collapse for the artistic vocabulary, the values and the canon identified with the great Western tradition inherited from the Renaissance. What are the motivations of this breakdown and what kind of creation did it give rise to? This class examines the drastic transformations occurring in the field of visual arts (concentrating on painting and sculpture) from the late 19th century (impressionism, post-impressionism) to the radical passage to abstraction in the mid-1910s. This panorama of a rapidly changing art scene will end on the emergence of post–World War I avant-garde movements such as Dada and Surrealism. Major figures, such as Cézanne, Picasso or Kandinsky will be studied with particular attention, while major movements—including Cubism, Fauvism—will be given specific attention. Readings of related literature, including the critical reception of the art of the time and artists’ writings, will contribute to the understanding of this crucial period.

TOPICS: ART SINCE 1945 (AH3064)

Type: 

Regular

This course presents the basic stylistic, thematic and theoritical concerns of the major movements in Western art, from WWII to the 1980’s. Investigating the diversity of artistic responses to the challenges posed by both aesthetics legacy of the past and the new political, social and economic climate of the post-war period, this course will focus on the relationship between aesthetic theory and artistic practice.

POP ART AND POP CULTURE (AH3065)

Type: 

Regular

Aesthetic autonomy is the notion that culture is a sphere apart, with each art distinct, and it is a bad word for most of us raised on postmodernist interdisciplinarity. We tend to forget that autonomy is always provisional, always defined diacritically and situated politically, always semi. …” Hal Foster (2002) Pop Art and Pop Culture investigates the relationships between arts (painting, architecture, design, film, music…) and the mass media, with a particular focus on the 1960s. Rather than relying on practical distinctions between high and low, fine arts and applied arts, serious experiment versus entertaining commercial product, the course will consider the intersections and links between the most advanced artistic endeavors and the aesthetics of the commercial and corporate environment.